Sunday, November 6, 2016

Working with Galleries




Many galleries require exclusive representation by geographic area or sales. They usually work on a commission percentage but some buyout at wholesale (very rare). Consult a lawyer before signing any contracts that are confusing to you.

Tips:
Look for galleries that currently promote work in your genre. Go online for contact names.

Look for gallery listings in:
Artsy Listings of Galleries

Art in NY FREE Resource Guide

Gallery Guides Online Listing

Art in America/Annual Guide

The Artist's & Graphic Designer's Market

List of University Art Galleries and Museums in the US by State


The Art Guide

Go gallery touring when visiting large cities and make detailed notes.


Personal Identity Package & Promotional Materials
Many galleries are now accepting electronic submissions through PDFs

Resume

Artist statement

Reproductions of work 

PDF
Digital Catalog

List of Works (title, medium, size, date, price, your name & copyright)

Head shot

Copy of reviews where your work is highlighted

Business card

Cover Letter 




For print submissions use a SASE and comment card (write gallery name on it for identification)

Consistent body of work to show

Confident attitude and clear understanding of work and goals

Follow up on both acceptances and rejections/make notes

Find out when they want to see originals, ask about the responsible party for shipping costs, framing, hanging, promo materials, etc.

What is their commission?

Calculating Your Desired Income 100 - Gallery commission = your % of income received THEN desired income = RETAIL PRICE your % income

CO-Op Galleries: (usually run by a group of artists) each artist helps in operating and maintaining the space. A % of sales is taken for expenses.

Vanity (Rental) Galleries: You rent space and organize your own show and promotion of it. BEWARE!

Shops: Low budget art/ no promo by shop and usually run on a 50/50 consignment.

Fairs & Trade shows: Booth rental where you must have your own display (rain, shine, or wind), business forms, etc. Some trade shows are juried and have competitions. Some are in large facilities and run regularly.


Resume for Gallery Work Education:

Degrees: order of most recent (MFA, BFA) Art Institutions attended Artists studied under

Gallery Affiliation: Gallery name(s), Place

Teaching: List Schools, Colleges, Institutions, etc.

Lectures:
Organizations, Institutions, Colleges, etc. Lecture Title, Place (City, State) Artist in Residences: Residence, City, State Project

Professional Affiliations: Organizations, Clubs, Memberships etc.

Exhibitions: Select One Person Shows and Group Shows

Awards, Grants, Fellowships: List Project and Organization Public & Corporate Collections: List Client and Place (ex: ABC Financial, Boston, MA)

Published Books & Articles: (written on your work or commissioned)



Annual TEFAF Art Market Report


Corporate Art Dealers/Consultants

http://www.bostonartrentals.com/

http://www.dsafinearts.com/

http://www.corporateartllc.com/

http://www.californiaimage.com/corporate-art-sales.htm

https://www.turningart.com/

http://artrental.com/index.html


http://artrentalne.com/#





Publishing Markets

For artists and authors wanting to create works for books or magazines, here are some insights. Many publishers are merging and many are being bought out and dissolved. A main publishing house may have many divisions and imprints under it.


BOOK PUBLISHING:

Primary Contacts: Creative Director, Art Director or Acquisitions Editor

Types: Mass Market, Trade, Children's Books, Text Books & Educational

Tips:
Always be aware of the publisher's marketing intentions especially when royalties are concerned. Some publishers will pay for models, props, photography etc.

Go to a large bookstore to see where your work would fit. Make note of publishers and look up their contact information and recent book list online.


Mass Market Books:

They are positioned to sell in general merchandising outlets and carry a varied distribution to retailers.


Types: Romance, Western, Science Fiction, Fantasy, Horror and Mystery


Tips:

Must have a strong knowledge of the genre in which you want to work.


Sources:
Literary Marketplace
Infinite Worlds by Vincent DiFate
Love Lines... Romance Reader's Guide to Printed Pleasures by Rosemary Guiley


Trade Books:
They are sold and marketed towards trade locations like bookstores. They range in subject matter and style. (Use a range from photography, graphic solutions and illustration on covers). Since the printing runs are low, the compensation is lower than mass market books. They are produced in both hard and soft cover editions and usually are larger in format than paperback books. Hard cover freelance assignments should negotiate a soft cover reprint price at the time of the hard cover contract.

Sources:
Literary and International Literary Marketplace
Writer's Market Covers & Jackets by Steven Heller & Anne Fink
Art for the Written Word 25 Yrs of Book Cover Art by Wendell Minor

Children's Books:
Children's Books (picture books) are usually a 32-page books that illustrate a very short text. They are targeted toward children as well as parents, educators and libraries. Models, props, etc. are sometimes reimbursable expenses with publishers. Also be aware of the intentions of marketing the book and how your work will be promoted and made into other adaptations (film, audio merchandise, etc.)

Tips: Must demonstrate a strong knowledge of character development with a narrative quality. Multicultural diversity is also good. You may want to have your contracts reviewed over by a lawyer because of the time commitment and royalty/payment set-up. Royalties run on the average 5% up to 15,000 copies and 6.25% thereafter. This doubles if you also write the book.

Submit your book dummies with a manuscript, color samples, cover letter, SASE and comment card. Make sure to register the pictures and text with the Library of Congress first.

Sources:
Children's Writers & Illustrators Market
Children's Book Council
Society of Illustrators Children's Book Panel & Exhibition
Society of Children's Book Writers & Illustrators
Book Links
American Library Association
The Very Best of Children's Book Illustration by the Society of Illustrators
NYC Writing for Young Children by Claudia Lewis
Writing & Illustrating Children's Books... Two Perspectives by Berthe Amos & Eric Suben

Education/Textbook:
Educational publishing is a lot of work for hire so be aware. Spot illustrations and work demonstrating or showing a process.


EDITORIAL:
Magazines and Newspapers have a specific personality and profile. Seek out the publications that fit your work or personality, ranging from trade to consumer. Magazines Newspapers Newsletters (often considered advertising as they are produced for in-house purposes or for distribution)

Primary Contacts:

Editorial Office (located in the publication table of contents)
Art Director
Editor

Tips: Newspapers have quick turn-around times and are limited in reproductive quality. Magazines have greater creative possibilities and reach a more targeted audience. You should show a strong knowledge of the medium with an understanding of the relationship between copy and art.

Sources:
SRDS (Trade and Consumer) Media Kits
Gale Directory of Publications
Editor and Publisher Yearbook
Gebbie Directory
Ulrich Intl. Periodical Directory
Barrons
Society of Publication Designers
Society of Illustrators
Editor & Publisher Magazine
Publishers Weekly Publish

Saturday, November 5, 2016

Corporate, Advertising and Design Markets


Corporations may work directly with an outside agency but a lot have an in-house creative department.

Contacts: 

VP Marketing/Corporate Communications
Marketing. Manager(s) (product/service specific)
Advertising Mgr. (in charge of promotional)
Product Manager(s)

Tips: Organizational hierarchy will vary.
Not very visual people. Need to communicate strongly with words.
May have to present work to a group, attend meetings and conference calls.
Experience in working with Creative Briefs.

Sources:
 
O'Dwyer's Directory of Corp. Communications
Standard Directory of Advertisers
Thomas Register of Manufacturers
Business Magazines Top 100 Advertisers Lists
Advertising Clubs
Trade Organizations
Art Director's Club
Direct Marketing Association
Chamber of Commerce

Adweek
Advertising Age
Target Marketing
Marketing & Media Decisions
Trade Specific Publications


Advertising Agency: (full-service) provides their clients with all the necessary services to handle their advertising efforts.

Job Functions & Responsibilities:
1. Account Services - responsible for agency/client relationship
2. Creative Services
- responsible for the design, production and control (traffic control) of projects.
             a. creative directors
             b. art directors
             c. designers
             d. layout and tech support
             e. writers, and other specialists
3. Marketing - media planning and placement, research, and sales promotion
4. Business Administration & Finance - accounting, office management, and personnel
5. Special Division - task force (new accounts, etc.)

Tips: Agencies require a strong knowledge of media (ie. newspaper vs. magazine) and reproduction (k/o, bleeds, traps, etc).

Projects will range from 2D and 3D print to broadcast animation. Clients will also vary.

Have some work in context.

Experience in working with Creative Briefs.

May have to present work to a group, attend meetings or conference calls.

High comprehensive layouts may be required for approval instead of roughs or sketches.

Your price will be marked up (17.65% is the industry standard).
A la Carte Agencies: an independent providing select agency services

Sources: 
Standard Directory of Advertising Agencies
Adweek Agency Directory
Business Magazines Top 100 Lists
American Association of Advertising Agencies
Advertising Clubs
Art Director's Club
Chamber of Commerce

Adweek
Advertising Age
Target Marketing
Marketing & Media Decisions
Graphic Design:USA
Communication Arts 
Print


Design Firms specialize in creative and will work with agencies and corporations.

Primary Contacts: 
 
Creative Director
Art Director

Tips: Some specialize in a particular market ( i.e. packaging, environmental, web design, etc.)
Double mark-up when design firms work with advertising agencies.
Some design firms work in COOP with advertising agencies.
Clients and projects will vary.

Sources: 
The Design Firm Directory
Graphic Artist Guild
Broadcast Designers Association
International Design by Electronics Assoc.
Type Directors Club
Society of Environmental Graphic Designers
Art Directors Club
AIGA Journal



Recruiters: (from freelance, part time and full time).
http://www.paladinstaff.com/

https://www.roberthalf.com/creativegroup

Tuesday, November 1, 2016

Enter Your Promo Materials!

How Magazine Self Promotion Annual

BEST OF SHOW Winner scores a free registration to HOW DESIGN LIVE 2018, plus an award to be presented at the conference. 

BEST OF SHOW Winner will enjoy a 2-page spread in the Fall Issue of HOW. 

All Winners (Best of Show, Outstanding Achievement and Merit Winners) will see their work in HOW’s FALL 2017 issue. 

All Outstanding Achievement and Merit Winners will receive a $100 discount on any HOW Design Live 2018 registration. 

All Winners will be announced in a feature article on HOWDesign.com and featured in its online gallery. 

All Winners will be formally announced in the HOW eNewsletter. 

All Winners will be announced via social media. 

All Winners will be featured on Pinterest throughout the year. 

All Winners will receive an exclusive Digital Seal to be used to promote your win. 

All Winners will receive a press release template for use in promoting your win. 

All winners will receive a complimentary copy of the Fall 2016 issue of HOW.

Monday, October 24, 2016

In the Media


Live Interviews:

Always make eye contact with the interviewer/audience, being aware of body language, hand gestures, voice quality and dress. Producers rate your performance.

Short, well thought out answers are best. Practice what you are going to say, especially for broadcast interviews.

Wear a watch so that you know when a broadcast segment is up, allowing ample time to wrap-up your thoughts.


Phone Interviews:
Ask for questions ahead of time. Avoid questions that speak off your agenda or that open up a Pandora’s box of things you do not want in the media.

You can also do print interviews via email if you feel more comfortable.

Make sure to mention your website!


Check out these student interviews:














































































Promoting on Your Website:

Magazine Features:

Book Features: